Skip to main content

Jeremy Cherfas

2018-04-11

1 min read

Digging into how withknown creates RSS feeds, I can see two things.

One is that for a status post, which has no title, `<title>` is a truncated version of the post content, although the level of truncation seems to vary. Not sure why.

The other is that even status posts, with a truncated `<title>`, have a full `<description>` that includes `p-name` and `e-content` and even `entry-content`.

But micro.blog does not seem to read `<description>` at least not when it is coming from my withknown RSS feed.

Puzzling.

Jeremy Cherfas

You can get good help

1 min read

I managed to fix a long-standing niggle with my practice this afternoon, thanks to some great help from cweiske and others. For the longest time Quill, a micropub client that I can use to publish here, wasn't showing me an option to syndicate directly to Twitter. That meant that I tended reply to tweets and stuff right there in the silo and not bring them back here. Fair enough, especially when a reply without context is like an egg without salt. But we figured it out, in part by that old standby of "switch it off and then switch it back on again". That got things working, and was enough of an impetus to upgrade WithKnown to the latest build. And so far, everything looks good.

Jeremy Cherfas

Twofer! Adactio's Ways and means and Tim Bray's Reviewing Ethics

2 min read

Two savvy treats on one day. Jeremy Keith takes a general look at the power of internet companies in his post on Ends and means. Tim Bray focuses specifically on the utility that is Google Maps in his post Reviewing Ethics.

Jeremy: Going back to the opening examples of online blackouts, was it morally wrong for companies to use their power to influence politics? Or would it have been morally wrong for them not to have used their influence?

Tim: Call me crazy, but I’d pass leg­is­la­tion to keep Google from do­ing what they’re do­ing. They should be able to sell space on the map­s, and they should be able to pro­vide qual­i­ty fil­ter­s, and col­lect feed­back on re­views and down­grade or up­grade them ac­cord­ing­ly. But no damn way should they own the map and the crowd­sourced value-adds on the map.

No collusion, I'm sure, just two smart people addressing their concerns about good behaviour by those who make and use the web.

Jeremy Cherfas

The worst possible feedback: it works for me.

1 min read

One of the good things about WordPress is how flexible it seems on the surface, able to perform all sorts of wizardry. One of the bad things about WordPress is how that very flexibility often makes it extremely difficult to achieve any sort of wizardry. That seems particularly true of anything to do with the .

So I was surprised to learn that Aaron Davis was having difficulty implementing a ZenPress child theme

Surprised because I run fornacalia.com with a ZenPress child theme and cannot recall any difficulties in setting that up. I think there may have been some issues with capitalisation of various names, but beyond that, I'm at a loss. I'd love to help -- but not sure how best to do that.

Maybe I should just share my child theme.

Jeremy Cherfas

About webmentions

2 min read

Webmentions are the glue that sticks all the bits in all the sites together.

That’s my one-liner about one of the core ideas about the , but it doesn’t actually tell you very much if you want to know how the glue works. I’ve kind of absorbed a moderately high-level abstraction over the past little while of playing with webmentions, but a friend asked for more:

Do you know of any diagrams that explain how this stuff works without all the … words that web communities seem to enjoy creating? I keep coming back to this topic every so often, and every time I return things just appear more complicated and broken than before …

I don’t think that last opinion is merited, but then I would say that. And right now I don’t have the time to write up my understanding. I’m pretty sure I saw something clear and to the point a little while back, but I’m blowed if I can find it now. So here are four pieces I have found.

These may not answer the question fully, but they are a start. And they might inspire me to write my own version, especially if I could have a synchronous discussion about it with my interlocuter.

Jeremy Cherfas

How to discourage enterprise in the English countryside

1 min read

I have only seen one side of Nick Snelgar's dispute with his local planning authority but I have no reason to doubt what I've seen there. To me it seems indisputable that, no matter what politicians like Michael Gove may say, there is no real desire to allow small farmers to reform the farming and food landscape in England.

Jeremy Cherfas

What's the problem?

1 min read

Over at Scripting News, Dave Winer says:

Every blog should have a Subscribe button. In an open ecosystem this is a problem, a problem that silos don't have. Which is the advantage Twitter (a silo) has over the open web.

I guess I'm not smart enough to see what that problem might be.

Jeremy Cherfas

Old posts open old wounds

1 min read

Some of the people rediscovering independent publishing on their own domains are agonising over self-censorship, guilt and the like. I'm slowly continuing to bring old posts over into my main site. That goes for the ones that hurt a bit to read.

The only ones I'm not bringing are link posts that include dead links. A few are just too topical to bother with. The others are coming over, albeit not very quickly, even if I have to go searching for archived pages to link to.

 

Jeremy Cherfas

Felix Salmon approves of Oxfam's latest inequality report

1 min read

Along the way, Salmon has this to say:

the world’s billionaires – the richest 2,000 people on the planet – saw their wealth increase by a staggering $762 billion in just one year. That’s an average of $381 million apiece. If those billionaires had simply been content with staying at their 2016 wealth, and had given their one-year gains to the world’s poorest people instead, then extreme poverty would have been eradicated. Hell, they could have eradicated extreme poverty, at least in theory, by giving up just one seventh of their annual gains.

Hang on a minute. Wouldn't the billionnaires need to make that awesome sacrifice every year? Or does the fact the people would slide back into extreme poverty next year not matter?

 

Jeremy Cherfas

2018-01-23 02

1 min read

Catching up on reviewing my Christmas reading: Unbelievably dystopian